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Edward SUMMERTON Born 1962 -

Biography

Edward Summerton was born in Dundee in 1962. He graduated from Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee in 1985. He works as a lecturer in Fine Art at the University of Dundee and has exhibited nationally and internationally for the past 20 years. He has organised and curated events and exhibitions and has work in private and public collections including the Royal Scottish Academy, the BBC and the Museum of Modern Art, New York. One Person Exhibitions include: Clermont Ferrand Art School France; Aberdeen Art Space; Seagate Gallery Dundee; Macrobert Art Centre Stirling; An Lanntair Lewis, VRC Dundee Contemporary Arts and galleries in Seoul, South Korea. Group Exhibitions include: "New Contemporaries" ICA London;"Lion Rampant" Artspace San Francisco;"Metropolis" RAAB Gallery London & Berlin";International Showcase" Limner Gallery NewYork and "Footsteps" Panzerhalle Berlin. He is an elected associate member of The Royal Scottish Academy.


‘Straight to You' was commissioned and published by Edinburgh Printmakers in 2005. Summerton's fascination with the representation of nature through book illustrations, field recordings, and dioramas have influenced his most recent works including his most recent exhibition at Edinburgh Printmakers Workshop, The Rural. His imagery is rooted in the illustrations culled from the natural history and fairy tale editions of the Ladybird series books from the 1960s and 70s. His gouache paintings, described as book interventions, flirt with the illustrations by way of mysterious, almost invisible detail, and are imbued with an idiosyncratic humour. The images slip in and out of recognition and illuminate a decaying romanticism that connects European folk tales to contemporary hallucinogenic experiences.


In the technique of screenprint sections of a fine woven screen (originally silk), which is stretched over a frame, are blocked out. Using a squeegee (rubber blade) ink is pressed through the screen onto a sheet of paper beneath. Only areas of the screen that are not blocked out will allow ink to pass through. Multiple coloured images require many screens and the image has to be carefully registered throughout printing. The artist can create the image in many ways, but at some point the image must be transferred onto (if it is not painted directly onto) transparent film. The films are transferred onto the screens by a light-sensitive process. Images may be transferred photographically onto the screens and printed; this process can be very sophisticated.


Purchased with assistance from the National Fund for Acquisitions administered with Government funds by the National Museum of Scotland.