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Charlie McQUEEN Born 1940 -

RSW

Biography

Charlie McQueen was born in Glasgow in 1940, educated at St Aloysius College and then attended the Glasgow School of Art. He is an elected member of the Royal Glasgow Institute (1983) and the Royal Scottish Society of Painters in Watercolour (1984). In 1994 he was elected vice-president of the RSW. He has exhibited widely - most recently at The Open Eye Gallery in Edinburgh and The Adam Gallery, Bath. Charlie McQueen has won numerous awards including in 1997 the Council Award of the RSW.

By using textured levels of paint and gesso McQueen depicts the sensation or experience of a place. He wrote recently...."The forms I use are forms remembered or dreamt about. The stark visual contrasts of moving between strong blinding sunlight and dark bazaars full of rich reds, golds and turquoise inhabit my paintings. This is like being put down to sleep in a darkened room with strong sunlight streaming through the shutters. This is not representation but an evocation".

His prints are editioned in Edinburgh Printmakers workshop using screen-print techniques from original paintings. In the technique of screenprint sections of a fine woven screen (originally silk), which is stretched over a frame, are blocked out. Using a squeegee (rubber blade) ink is pressed through the screen onto a sheet of paper beneath. Only areas of the screen that are not blocked out will allow ink to pass through. Multiple coloured images require many screens and the image has to be carefully registered throughout printing. The artist can create the image in many ways, but at some point the image must be transferred onto (if it is not painted directly onto) transparent film. The films are transferred onto the screens by a light-sensitive process. Images may be transferred photographically onto the screens and printed; this process can be very sophisticated.

Purchased with assistance from the National Fund for Acquisitions administered with Government funds by the National Museum of Scotland.