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Arthur Bloomfield Merric BOYD 1920 - 1999

Biography

The Antipodean Chagall
 
Arthur Merric Bloomfield Boyd, AC (Companion of the Order of Australia), OBE was born into the Australian Boyd artistic dynasty and became one of the leading  Australian painters and prolific printmakers of the late 20th century.
 
Boyd trained briefly in 1935 at the National Gallery Art School in Melbourne, but this was all the formal training that he underwent. From 1936-1939 he studied with his grandfather, the painter Arthur Merric Boyd.
 
He moved to the inner city where he was influenced by his contact with European refugees. Reflecting this move in the late 1930s, his work moved into a distinct period of depictions of fanciful characters in urban settings. In the 1940s he was a member of the Angry Penguins artistic and literary group. His best-known work is perhaps his 'Half Caste Bride' series in the 1950s, based on his contact with Aboriginal culture in Alice Springs in 1951. He represented Australia alongside Arthur Streeton at the Venice Biennale in 1958, doing so again 30 years later at the 43rd festival.
 
Feeling drawn to European styles of painting, Boyd moved to Hampstead, London in 1960. He lived to Britain between 1959-1971 settling in Sussex. He returned to Australia in 1971, as one of Australia's most highly regarded artists.
 
His creations now focused on the primeval natural settings found in the Australian bush and in later years explored the interplay between human land use and natural wilderness.
 
Boyd's work ranges from impressionist renderings of Australian landscape to starkly expressionist figuration, and many canvases 
 
feature both. He was a member of the Antipodeans, a group of Melbourne painters.
 
He was awarded the Australian of the year award in 1995